Tag Archives: Sci-Fi

Jack Vance

Maske-Thaery by Jack VanceI’m rediscovering my love for the old novels of Jack Vance. His protagonists drive their stories like none other; his aliens are the most alien; his other-worlds and other-societies are as amazingly immersive as they are completely, freakishly strange.

I was afraid revisiting these stories that I had loved as a teenager would not hold up. I’m happy to report that they do.

This one, Maske: Thaery is my favorite, followed closely by the five books in his epic revenge space opera, The Demon Princes.

Sci-Fi Writers Take Note: There Are Way More Stars Than We Thought

I just read a fascinating news release from JPL about a sounding rocket experiment that measures the light between galaxies. The conclusion: “While we have previously observed cases where stars are flung from galaxies in a tidal stream, our new measurement implies this process is widespread.”

In other words, there are way, way more stars out there than we thought, drifting in-between the galaxies.

From the article: “The light looks too bright and too blue to be coming from the first generation of galaxies,” said James Bock, principal investigator of the CIBER project from Caltech and JPL. “The simplest explanation, which best explains the measurements, is that many stars have been ripped from their galactic birthplace, and that the stripped stars emit on average about as much light as the galaxies themselves.” [My emphasis.]

So for every galaxy of stars out there, there’s another galaxy worth of stars drifting around between the galaxies. To me that means there’s twice as many stars as we thought in the Universe, which also means there’s twice as many chances for habitable worlds.

It also means that in your star trekking speculative fiction, really advanced galactic civilizations could more conceivably make their way to other galaxies, as it’s not a big huge empty stretch between — according to the article, it’s more like a halo of stars between, and perhaps even bridging, the spaces between galaxies.

It’s fascinating to me to think of civilizations developing among these isolated, far flung stars, and now mathematically speaking, the chances of other civilizations existing have essentially doubled.

Okay, I’ve planted the seed in your imaginations. Let them run wild!

Here’s a link to the article: The Universe is Brighter Than We Thought »

Philip José Farmer is dead

Another writer gone. I remember first reading Philip’s story “Riders of the Purple Wage” in Harlan Ellison’s “Dangerous Visions” anthology. His works have always been a wild ride.

RIP Philip.